The Lamp

Where truth can be shared.

Slavery Isn’t a Relic of the Past

Posted by thelamp on February 26, 2007

The 16,000-member Christian Medical Association (CMA) has asked the Bush administration and its federal agencies to take part in a nationwide education campaign to help medical professionals better identify victims of human trafficking.

Since the training would increase the likelihood of treating people who have been tortured and sold, the Center for Moral Clarity endorses such educational campaigns as one more way of restoring value to human life.

Click Here to download and watch the latest CMC Moment, and hear Pastor Rod Parsley’s message on slavery.

Dr. Jeffrey Barrows, a CMA member, has been teaching other doctors about the existence of modern-day slavery and how to recognize the tell-tale signs of victimization by traffickers. According to the doctor, a recent study found that 28 percent of human trafficking victims were taken to see health-care professionals who did not realize the horrific trauma they had endured.

This finding, Barrows said, is evidence that the CMA training is needed. So the Christian physicians developed an online, continuing medical education program, which they hope the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of State will champion.

CMA’s emphasis on human trafficking is being advanced in conjunction with the soon-to-be-released movie “Amazing Grace,” a biographical film on abolitionist William Wilberforce. As a member of the British House of Commons, Wilberforce fought for 20 years to pass legislation banning the slave trade. On Feb. 23, 1807, Parliament banned buying and selling humans in the British Empire, but it was not until 1833 that the House of Commons voted to abolish slavery altogether.

The Feb. 23 release of “Amazing Grace” has been timed to coincide with the 200th anniversary of the end of the slave trade in Britain. The abolition of slavery, however, remains an unfinished story. Two centuries years later, human trafficking still claims hundreds of thousands of victims. So Wilberforce’s legacy must serve as an inspiration to continue the fight for human life and dignity.

Click here to send an e-mail to your U.S. senator, asking him or her to pass Senate Resolution 84, which honors William Wilberforce and the end of the British slave trade.

For many Americans, slavery is an institution of a long-gone era, ending with the Civil War in 1865. The grim reality, though, is that slavery isn’t relegated to history, and the trade of human chattel has evolved into the trafficking of women and children. The U.S. State Department estimates that there are 27 million people worldwide who are living in slavery today.

Awareness is the first step toward change. The ongoing human rights violations in Sudan deserve America’s attention, but it’s insufficient to merely raise public awareness on the issue. Christians have a moral obligation to be a voice for the victims of human trafficking.

CMC members can use their voice to denounce the violence and killing associated with modern-day slavery. The Center for Moral Clarity also supports accountability, which can be achieved by pulling American investment dollars out of Sudan until the atrocities end.

Click here to send an e-mail to Congress asking your representatives to pass House Resolution 7, denouncing the genocide in Darfur.

Click here to send an e-mail to Congress asking your representatives to pass H.R. 180, the Darfur Accountability and Divestment Act.

Source:  www.centerformoralclarity.net

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One Response to “Slavery Isn’t a Relic of the Past”

  1. Allie said

    Great post, some friend of mine are very involved in the fight against human trafficking. Thanks for informing people!
    -Allie

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