The Lamp

Where truth can be shared.

What’s at Stake: Key Election Issues

Posted by thelamp on October 26, 2006

 

  • Preserving Marriage Voters in eight states have a tremendous opportunity to strengthen the moral fiber of America, and the Center for Moral Clarity encourages every registered voter in Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin to take full advantage of it.

    “Finally, in these states the assault on marriage and family can come to an end, and they can join the 19 other states that have preserved the institution of marriage with a constitutional amendment,” said Pastor Rod Parsley, founder and president of the Center for Moral Clarity. “Now men and women – families – in eight more states can take a step toward America’s moral reformation. They can clearly and unequivocally define marriage as the union of one man and one woman. They can stand up and say enough is enough.”

    Arizona Marriage Amendment
    Proposition 107 would define marriage in Arizona’s Constitution as the union of one man and one woman. It also would bar governments from recognizing any alternative to marriage, such as civil unions or domestic partnerships, for couples both gay and straight. Click here to read Proposition 107 as it appears on the Nov. 7 ballot.

    CMC Recommendation: Vote “Yes” on Arizona Proposition 107

    Colorado Decides Marriage and Domestic Partners
    Two initiatives on Colorado’s ballot address how the state will treat marriage. Amendment 43 would define marriage in the state Constitution as a union between one man and one woman. Colorado residents understand that anything short of a state constitutional amendment defending marriage this year will enable state judges and legislators to potentially redefine marriage – even against the will of the people.

    Clergy across denominational lines and all religious expressions in Colorado have spoken up to say that any attack on the identity of marriage and the family undermines society itself. They have proclaimed that every effort to defend marriage and the family serves the common good. This is why Amendment 43 is so vitally important.
    Click here to read Amendment 43 as it appears on the Nov. 7 ballot.

    CMC Recommendation: Vote “Yes” on Colorado Amendment 43

    Idaho
    Ballot Initiative H.J.R. 2 establishes that marriage between a man and a woman is the only domestic legal union recognized in that state. Click here to read H.J.R. 2 as it appears on the Nov. 7 ballot.

    CMC Recommendation: Vote “Yes” on Ballot Initiative H.J.R. 2

    South Carolina
    Amendment 1 provides that the institution of marriage in South Carolina consists only of the union between one man and one woman. If passed, no other domestic union would be considered valid and legal.

    A resident of South Carolina who believes the biblical definition of marriage should prevail recently said, “If we allow marriage to mean anything in South Carolina, it will mean nothing.” This is one voice, but it reflects the views of people motivated to put the measure to a vote.
    Click here to read South Carolina Amendment 1 as it appears on the Nov. 7 ballot.
    CMC Recommendation: Vote “Yes” on South Carolina Amendment 1

    South Dakota
    Constitutional Amendment C is an amendment to Article XXI of the South Dakota Constitution relating to marriage. South Dakota statutes currently limit marriage to unions between a man and a woman. However, the State Constitution does not address marriage.

    Amendment C would amend the State Constitution to allow and recognize marriage only between a man and a woman. It would also prohibit the Legislature from allowing or recognizing civil unions, domestic partnerships or other quasi-marital relationships between two or more persons regardless of sex.
    Click here to read South Dakota Amendment C as it appears on the Nov. 7 ballot.
    CMC Recommendation: Vote “Yes” on South Dakota Amendment C

    Tennessee
    Passage of Amendment 1 would define marriage as being between one man and one woman.
    Click here to read Tennessee Amendment 1 as it appears on the Nov. 7 ballot.

    CMC Recommendation: Vote “Yes” on Tennessee Amendment 1

    Virginia
    If approved by the voters, Question 1 on the Nov. 7 ballot would make a ban on same-sex marriage part of the Constitution of Virginia. The proposed amendment adds a definition of marriage as the “union between one man and one woman” to the Constitution’s Bill of Rights and prohibits Virginia and its counties, cities, and towns from creating or recognizing any legal status by any name which is comparable to marriage.
    Click here to read Virginia Question 1 as it appears on the Nov. 7 ballot.

    CMC Recommendation: Vote “Yes” on Virginia Question 1

    Wisconsin
    Question 1 on the Wisconsin ballot addresses the definition of marriage. Under present Wisconsin law, only a marriage between a husband and a wife is recognized as valid in this state. A husband is commonly defined as a man who is married to a woman, and a wife is commonly defined as a woman who is married to a man.

    A “yes” vote would make the existing restriction on marriage as a union between a man and a woman part of the state constitution, and would prohibit any recognition of the validity of a marriage between persons other than one man and one woman.

    Click here to read Wisconsin Question 1 as it appears on the Nov. 7 ballot.

    CMC Recommendation: Vote “Yes” on Wisconsin Question 1

  • Cloning Missouri’s Amendment 2 Could Make Cloning a Constitutional Right

    Amendment 2 has been called a Trojan horse because its wording hides the true purpose and effect of the constitutional change. This amendment merges cloning and human embryonic stem-cell research.

    The multimillion-dollar public-relations campaign highlights potential cures from stem-cell research but obscures the extremely important distinctions between adult stem-cell research and embryonic stem-cell research, which cannot be performed without loss of life. Supporters of the amendment are misleading the voting public. At first glance, Amendment 2 appears to ban cloning, but the fine print actually could make cloning a constitutional right.

    If this lengthy proposal passes, Amendment 2 would make it legal to farm eggs—a procedure that exploits poor women and places their health in jeopardy. Click here to read Amendment 2 as it appears on the Nov. 7 ballot.

    CMC Recommendation: Vote “No” on Missouri’s Amendment 2

  • Gambling Ohio Voters Consider Slot Machines

    Issue 3, a proposal called Learn and Earn would amend the state Constitution to:

  • Permit up to 31,500 slot machines at seven horse racing tracks and at two Cleveland non-track locations.
  • Permit expanded gaming in the four Cuyahoga County locations if approved by the county’s voters.
  • Distribute the revenues as follows:
  • 55% to the slot and casino owners and operators.
  • 30% to the Board of Regents for college scholarships and grants to eligible students and administration of the program. The remaining revenues would be divided among local governments, race tracks for purse money, gambling addiction services, and the administration of a gaming commission comprised of five members appointed by the governor and the majority legislative leaders.

    Click here to read Issue 3 as it appears on the Nov. 7 ballot.

    CMC Recommendation: Vote “No” on Ohio Issue 3

  • Abortion South Dakota’s Referred Law 6
    In South Dakota, Referred Law 6 protects unborn life along with women’s health. The opponents of the law claim that it lacks provisions for: 1) rape and incest victims (note that less than 2% of abortions in South Dakota have been due to rape or incest), 2) covering medical care for women who have been assaulted, 3) won’t allow abortion to save the life of the mother, and 4) leaves doctors vulnerable to law suits when they are conducting legitimate medical procedures on women that result in a pre-born baby’s death. All four claims are false. The law protects women and doctors in the instances mentioned previously. More importantly, it recognizes that abortion hurts women. The South Dakota Task Force to Study Abortion reviewed more 3,500 pages of scientific research, collected affidavits from 2,000 women who had undergone abortions, and interviewed 54 experts to conclude that abortion has lasting, devastating effects on women’s lives.

    Click here to read the proposed amendment as it appears on the Nov. 7 ballot.

    CMC Recommendation: Vote “Yes” on South Dakota’s Referred Law 6

  • Source:  www.centerformoralclarity.net

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    One Response to “What’s at Stake: Key Election Issues”

    1. Ann said

      wow :-O

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